Panier of Plenty

Vernissage

A series of paintings in gouache for group exhibition hosted by ‘La Ronde Céretane’ (a popular annual running event). The brief was ‘A woman artist’s view on sport’. At first I was unsure, but soon found myself immersed in the world of symbolism, after contemplating my entry last year: the sole of a Nike running shoe, transformed. I plunged headfirst into the world of Ancient Greece (oblivious to the fact it was an Olympic year) and after meeting the goddess Nike, discovered that women had their own games, dedicated to the goddess Hera…

A series of eight

A series of eight

An enthusiastic reception

An enthusiastic reception

Morning light, Salle Manolo

Morning light, Salle Manolo

The exhibition is open to the public until next week…

The departure… the world of symbols, inspired by my 2015 design : the route of the 
Ronde Céretane (in the village and up in the hills, incorporating a festive spirit as well 
as the Catalan flag), all on the sole of a Nike sports shoe…

The tread of a Nike running shoe

The tread of a Nike running shoe

The winged goddess Nike makes an appearance with a wreath of bay leaves…

The goddess Nike

The goddess Nike

Artefacts found in Olympia depict male athletes. Where are the women?

Relics from Olympia

Relic from Olympia, altered

The ancient Heraean Games, dedicated to the goddess Hera (Heraia) were the first sanctioned (and recorded) women’s athletic competition (foot races) to be held at Olympia, possibly in the Olympic year, prior to the men’s events, as early as the 6th century BC. 
The women participants were described as ‘peacemakers’. Champions won olive crowns. 
They were described as having their hair free, yet disguised as men.

The Heraean

The Heraean

Although ancient Roman women were depicted as athletes, little mention exists until women competed in the Olympic Games in Paris, in 1900.

History of women

History of women

The goddess Hera, Queen of the gods, raises a sacred sign of purification the peacock feather, resembling a flame, a pomegranate and palm branch (phoenix) – a symbol of victory, triumph, peace and eternal life.

The goddess Hera

The goddess Hera

The sacred flame, signifying peace reigning. Carried forward from antiquity, the basis 
of many modern day rituals that permeate our cultural traditions.

The sacred flame

The sacred flame

The branches of the sacred wild olive tree were cut with a pair of golden scissors and placed on a gold-ivory table in the temple of Hera. As leaves are intertwined to form a wreath (kotinos), victory is transformed into ‘peace’. It is a state of mind. We thus come back ‘full circle’ to Céret.

Peace

Peace

Advertisements
This entry was published on September 15, 2016 at 4:10 pm. It’s filed under Adventure, Antipodean, Architecture, Art, Automne, Autumn, Catalan, Céret, child, Childhood, Country Life, Country Living, Creative, Cultural Creative, Culture and Arts, Current Events, Design, Environment, Europe, Ex Advertising Creative, Expat, France, French Culture, History, La Vie Quotidienne, Landscape, Language, Languedoc Roussillon, Leisure, Life, Lifestyle, Literature, Living in France, Mediterranean, New Zealander in France, Philosophy, Photography, Pyrénées, Pyrénées-Orientales, Seasons, South of France, Tourism, Working in France, Writing and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Follow any comments here with the RSS feed for this post.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: