Panier of Plenty

The Art of Observation

Adapting to a new environment means making friends with the unfamiliar. Treading new paths, observing new sights and adjusting to the daily rhythms that underpin life. Watching the play of light, the changing of the seasons and becoming aware of weather patterns. Discovering monuments and icons and finding inspiration. And, looking at what has ‘gone before”- the echoes of the past that are still very present in these hills and streets.

Landscape painting has been a tradition here as artists came on séjours – invited to enjoy the sunshine of the south or following in others footsteps by way of pilgrimage. Each has left their unique trace, as ‘their way of seeing’ endures on paper or canvas, or other more substantial media. The Musée d’Art Moderne, Céret, houses a collection of now iconic works representing artists considered radical for their time, but as we know, times change and the idea of contemporary advances with the mode of thinking and fashion of the day. Yet the common thread that still exists, that links all ‘artists’ or those who are inclined to ‘creative pursuits’ is observation. Wandering, reflecting, seeing what others fail to notice and then concocting in the mind’s eye – processing, disseminating and finally ‘realising’ an impression that can then be shared and admired, or equally, raise questions…

André Masson, Rue de Céret, 1919

André Masson, Rue de Céret, 1919

Le Couvent des Capucins à Céret

André Masson, 1919

Le Couvent des Capucins à Céret

Jean Marchand, 1912

Jean Marchand, 1912

Le Couvent des Capucins à Céret

Maurice Loutreuil, 1919

Maurice Loutreuil, 1919

El Carrer Llarg ou Les Toits vu du Castellas

Max Jacob, Paysage de Céret, 1910

Max Jacob, Paysage de Céret, 1910

Pinkus Krémènge, Les Palmiers è Céret, 1920

Pinkus Krémènge, Les Palmiers è Céret, 1920

La Terrasse au Printemps

Pierre Brune, 1955, La Terrasse au Printemps

Arbit Blatas, 1934

Arbit Blatas, 1934

Place de la Liberté à Céret

Raoul Dufy, 1940

Raoul Dufy, 1940

Paysage à Céret, l’église

Vincent Bioulès, 2005-2006

Vincent Bioulès, 2005-2006

Le Canigou and plane trees on a grand scale

Le Pont du Diable, Vincent Bioulès

Le Pont du Diable, Vincent Bioulès

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This entry was published on January 19, 2015 at 1:13 pm. It’s filed under Antipodean, Architecture, Art, Catalan, Country Life, Country Living, Creative, Cultural Creative, Culture and Arts, Design, Environment, Europe, Ex Advertising Creative, Expat, France, French Culture, History, Landscape, Languedoc Roussillon, Leisure, Life, Lifestyle, Living in France, Media, Mediterranean, New Zealander in France, Pyrénées, Pyrénées-Orientales, Rural Life, Seasons, South of France, Thoughts, Tourism, Travel and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Follow any comments here with the RSS feed for this post.

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