Panier of Plenty

Autumn Arrives

As we officially move into Autumn, the rhythm has changed to ‘harvest’.
The vegetable garden has once again provided more than enough to
nourish us and it is wonderful to give away produce – sharing in the
abundance. There is still much to do: preparing the pumpkins for the
cellar, turning the earth and picking the final melons, bottling
tomatoes, cooking quinces (with wine and thyme) and organising seeds
(keeping them when we eat a courgette, for example, and drying them).
We are ready to plant for winter, and the weeds are starting to come
back after a few days of mist and drizzle.

The view from my desk.

Although there is much dying off, there is also new life – a flourish
of flowers in yellow, lilac and pink, as others end. Autumn brings
‘fruition’, as all efforts are rewarded and plenty reigns.

Pumkins, squash, gourd and goodness knows what…

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This entry was published on September 25, 2012 at 6:43 pm. It’s filed under Country Life, Country Living, Cuisine, Environment, Europe, Expat, Food, France, French Culture, Garden, Health, Home, La Vie Quotidienne, Languedoc Roussillon, Leisure, Life, Lifestyle, Mediterranean, Nature, Pyrénées, Rural Life, Seasons, South of France, Thoughts, Travel and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Follow any comments here with the RSS feed for this post.

6 thoughts on “Autumn Arrives

  1. Hi Vivienne, I’m stunned by the incredibly variety of those gourds and pumpkins there. Those beautiful jewelled colours are too incredible! I love the principle behind seed saving, sometimes I’ve kept aside the odd bean or so for our (balcony garden) and been pleasantly surprised when they make an appearance. Happy Eating!

  2. A wonderful selection of pumpkins and squash. We’ve had a bad year for them – normally they self seed in the vegetable garden but nothing came up this year, not even the seeds sown in the right place.

    • Hello Anne, We only had four last year, this year a few self-seeded and I moved them (think they came from the compost?), and we had many ‘mystery’ varieties from a plant exchange. I started many seedlings (saved seeds) in the hothouse – I hope next year is better for you, I would gladly swap pumpkins for your raspberries! Everything is a bit haywire with such extremes in weather conditions, this time last year we swam in the ocean, and yesterday I lit the first fire!

  3. mesarapugs on said:

    An incredible bounty of colour!

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